Annal Nayyar reports School Reform Minister Nick Gibb today congratulated pupils and teachers after improved results in tests taken by 11-year-olds in reading, writing and maths.

The figures show that for this year’s key stage tests (taken in May by 550,000 children in their final year of primary school):

  • 4 out of 5 11-year-olds (79%) achieved at least the expected level (level 4) in reading, writing and arithmetic (3Rs) – up from 3 out of 4 (75%) last year, and just 6 in 10 (62%) in 2009
  • almost a quarter (24%) exceeded the expected level in the 3Rs - up from a fifth (21%) last year, and from just 1 in 8 (13%) in 2009

Comparisons with 2010, in terms of numbers, are not possible because a quarter of primary schools did not administer the tests that year.

It means that:

  • 81,000 more children than in 2009 are meeting the expected standard in the 3 Rs (440,000 this year compared to 359,000 in 2009)
  • 59,000 more children than in 2009 are exceeding the expected standard in the 3 Rs (134,000 this year compared to 75,000 in 2009)

This is against a backdrop of higher aspirations that all children achieve their potential, including:

  • a new test in spelling, punctuation and grammar (introduced last year)
  • the banning of calculators from maths tests (for the first time this year)
  • higher floor standards (up to 65% this year)

And there were improvements in each of the individual subjects:

  • reading – 9 out of 10 children (89%) reached at least level 4 (up 3 percentage points from last year) and half exceeded that (up 5 percentage points)
  • spelling, punctuation and grammar – three-quarters (76%) reached at least level 4 (up 3 percentage points from last year) and more than half (52%) exceeded that (up 5 percentage points)
  • maths – almost 9 out of 10 (86%) reached at least level 4 (up 1 percentage point from last year) and 4 in 10 exceeded that (up 1 percentage point)
  • writing (teacher-assessed) – almost 9 out of 10 (85%) reached at least level 4 (up 2 percentage points from last year) and two-thirds exceeded that (up 3 percentage points)

School Reform Minister Nick Gibb said:

80,000 more children than 5 years ago will start secondary school this year secure in the basics – and able to move on to more complex subjects. It means in the long term these children stand a far better chance of winning a place at university, gaining an apprenticeship and securing good jobs.

We have set unashamedly high expectations for all children, introduced a new test in the basics of punctuation, spelling and grammar, and removed calculators from maths tests.

Today’s results show teachers and pupils have responded well to the higher standards our education reforms have demanded. Our education system is beginning to show the first fruits of our plan for education, helping to prepare young people for life in modern Britain. There is more to do but teachers and pupils deserve huge credit for such outstanding results.

 

 

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